4 Q’s to Disarming Anger

Listen to the “Quick Tips for Managing Anger” podcast: Episodes:
Feb. 2021: 4 Q’s to Disarming Anger – (MP3 format) 7min. 20 sec.
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Description: What can you do to stop harmful anger and it’s consequences? Here are some helpful questions and tips for developing self-control and relationships!

Jan. 2021: Growing with Anger & Violence – (MP3 format) 10 min. 5 sec.
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Description: Children often grow up in homes of high conflict and out-of-control anger. What are the consequences? How can you help?Visit the What’s Good About Anger Institute for our FAQs, All About Anger Blog and podcasts which will teach you healthy anger management skills for relationships. Anger can be an overwhelming emotion that makes us feel like we have no control over it. Discover tools which will empower you to cope with stress and anger in healthy and effective ways.Quick Tips for Managing Anger is a show about how deal with anger effectively and practically.

Throughout the week Lynette Hoy, Anger Management Specialist, presents insights and skills for managing anger. You can learn to change unhealthy anger into a positive force which accomplishes something good for yourself and others! No more yelling, swearing, manipulating or giving the ‘cold shoulder’. Train yourself to turn anger into faith, assertiveness, problem-solving, empathy and forgiveness! As a result you will find that life and relationships are much more safisfying!

To subscribe to the free Quick Tips podcasts – just click on this feedburner link or listen on the apple site here. Then, download all the episodes to your ipod or MP3 player- and “podcast your way to managing anger”.

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Can’t Get Rid of the Rage!

Question: Hi , I am really worried people close to me say I need help. This is why. I take things so personally things people do say or decisions they make. It really makes me angry! I think the way i treat others they should treat me the same. eye 4 an eye attitude really. This has made me have many fights. The main problem involves my girl Friend she is the main trigger of my psycho behavior. When we argue it can get nasty I would say i have a really long fuse when it comes to losing my rag. where as she loses it very fast,
basically it gets to a point when I can’t be calm any more my body jus takes over I feel like an adrenaline rush a blow my top I cant stop this and lasts at least an least half hour I scream and shout argue like mad and feel like I want to lash out at her or people violently! Don’t get me wrong i have never and will never strike a girl. I just make my girlfreind very scared. we are both in love still and been together about a 2 years if you don’t count the break ups. The last thing I want is to lose her. I used to cry before the rage but now get angry straight away.Is this normal to have no way of stopping this temper?
My grandfather was a large tempered man could this have something to do with it?
Please help! Thank you.

Answer: Dear Friend, There may be a lot of triggers provoking you. It’s possible that drinking or smoking pot makes you vulnerable to anger and rage. Even though there are many triggers for anger, you do make the choice to get angry. It may seem like you don’t because the adrenaline overcomes you so quickly. That is part of the normal physiological response to a threatening situation which trips your fight/flight mechanism.
I like to put it this way: some people have a very fragile fight/flight mechanism because of learned patterns or reactions to frustrating situations, low self-esteem, disrespectful or rude behavior or blocked goals.
Obviously, there are times when you should be angry – the world needs anger. The world allows evil to go on because there isn’t enough anger to put an end to it.
But, the kind of rage you are describing could worsen unless you work on changing. I believe that learning to avoid triggers, gaining anger management skills and challenging your self-talk could really greatly defuse your anger. It helps to play some phrases in your head prior to a provoking situation such as:
“cool down”‘ “maybe he/she is having a bad day”; “this isn’t the end of the world”; “I can handle this later”; “take a time-out”, “I don’t want to let this get the best of me”, etc.
The way you perceive an event and what you say to yourself has a lot to do with how much anger you will experience. People with “hot self-talk” will lash out immediately because they think: “I shouldn’t put up with that”; “they have no right to treat me that way”; “they’ll pay for that”, etc.
When people are disrespectful of you – you can learn some assertiveness skills to paraphrase what they have said such as: “did I hear you correctly? Are you saying that you think I’m not keeping up with my share of the workload?”
Maybe they’ll say: “oh no. I didn’t mean to say that. I was just complaining about how much work there is to do.”

Obviously, you need to openly yet, tactfully confront someone who is calling you names or putting you down. You need to stand up for yourself. But, you don’t have to blow-up at them. When you blow-up people will think less of you.
You can say, “there is no cause to call me names. I find that disrespectful.” Most of the time, the person will apologize.

As far as your girlfriend is concerned – I think there are some underlying issues between you. Maybe you don’t feel respected and heard, and maybe she is worried about your commitment and love.

You may consider getting counseling. Often- just gaining an understanding of anger and learning better communication skills and how to avoid triggers can really be the key. God bless!

© copyright 2021 by Lynette Hoy, NCC, LCPC. Lynette is a Marriage and Family Counselor with CounselCare Connection , National Certified Counselor, Anger Management Specialist-V and Diplomate with the National Anger Management Association. She is the co-author of What’s Good About Anger? and a speaker for community, women’s and church organizations.

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Tips for Preventing Post-Holiday Anger..

Are you the victim of Post-Holiday Anger?

The holidays are times when people tend to get stressed out, emotional, feel lonely and angry. Why? Because we expect to feel happy during the holidays. We want to feel close to others and satified with our lives. The expectations, the stress, regrets, partying and memories lead to negative feelings and self-talk. When the holidays are over – we wish our get togethers with family and friends had gone better. We wish COVID was no longer a problem.

How can you prevent and deal with post-holiday stress and anger?

1. Don’t drink to drown your feelings. Drinking only increases negative feelings and heightens anger. Alcohol has a disinhibiting effect on the body and on your brain. Alcohol will seem to soothe the troubles you have but, only temporarily. Alcohol clouds  judgment and thus, you will act out your raw emotions without processing them cognitively.

2. Don’t relive the past. Holidays tend to bring up the past – regrets and losses you have experienced. It’s ok to process these events in a healthy way such as expressing your feelings to others but, ruminating on them can be disasterous. It will lead to depression and anger. You can’t do anything about the past – but, you can do something to help move you into the future in a positive way.

3. Take care of yourself and you will take care of your anger.
Reduce the stress in your life.
Increase exercise and nutrition.
Grow positive, healthy relationships.
Learn to communicate assertively and respectfully.
Plan a new goal in your life – take a class, learn a craft or sport.
Accept that life is hard but, determine to meet it’s challenges.
Develop your faith.
Understand your anger – it’s triggers, when it is normal and valid and
apply the problem-solving and anger management skills from What’s Good About Anger.

Lynette J. Hoy, NCC, LCPC, CAMS-V
Diplomate, NAMA; President, CounselCare Connection, P.C.
Anger Management Institute blog, courses, training  podcasts and resources

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Anger at Work….

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I don’t really know where to begin… I’m 22. I work at a daycare, and each day I take care of between 6-10 children from age of 7 mo. – 1 year 4 mo. It is stressful. The kids cry … Continue reading

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Anger and Aggression….

Question:
When someone starts calling me names or taunting me, it winds me up very easily. Especially when they say things that I feel hit a nerve. Things like saying I have no friends, that I’m weird or a loner, the one that gets to me quickest is when they mention that I don’t have a girlfriend or worse still, if they ask me where she is (I’ve not dated anyone since my girl killed herself a few years ago).

The worst part of it is that the closer the person is to me, the worse I react. If I don’t care about someone’s opinion or the person in general I’ll just ignore them but the people I care about end up being the ones I’ll take it out on. I don’t know what’s wrong with me, it’s like I focus all my aggression on myself and my close friends. More myself than anyone else. I’d probably be dead already had I not read about using ice instead of razors to mimic cutting instead of actually doing it a while back. I find myself wanting to attack people when they say bad things about me, but the things they say are true, so I take it out on myself. It’s better that way. I don’t want to hurt anyone, but when they push me to a certain point it’s almost like I’m just watching myself do it.

Answer:
Dear Friend,
It’s normal to feel badly when someone puts you down or disrespects you. We all deserve to be treated with dignity and respect.
But, you need to work on feeling confident about yourself and how to express your feelings and responses in healthy and assertive ways to those people.
Here are some ideas:
1. Change your self-talk to: “that person may be trying to get my goat – but, I’m not going to let him/her.” “I’m going to tell that person how I feel and that they should not be talking disrespectfully to me.”

2. Take a break: “I’m going to take a breather and think about how to respond to that person later.” Taking a time-out will give your body time to cool-down and the frontal cortex of your brain time to start taking over the emotional (amydala) portion of your brain which wants to lash out.

3. Consider going to counseling to work through the self-mutilation, low self-esteem, grief and other issues you are dealing with. When you feel badly about yourself – you will emotionally overreact to put-downs.
See the directory of counselors at:  www.counselcareconnection.org ,
www.aacc.net and www.nbcc.org

4. Learn some anger management skills to help you cope with these situations. See www.whatsgoodaboutanger.com for FAQs, Quick Tips for Managing Anger Podcasts and the All About Anger blog.
_________________
Lynette J. Hoy, NCC, LCPC, CAMS-V, Certified Anger Management Specialist-V
What’s Good About Anger podcasts, blog, resources

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Have you ever wondered what causes anger to rear it’s ugly head so quickly?  In our books I have talked about how expectations, self-talk and choices trigger and amplify anger.
Anger is ultimately a physiological and a cognitive response to certain triggers.  It’s different for everyone. You might be able to shrug-off some triggers such as –  a co-worker not listening to you but, fly into a rage when you can’t get your spouse’s attention.
What you tell yourself or the expectations you hold onto for other people and life goals will impact how you respond to those triggers. You then make the choice to act on the anger you feel.
How can you break out of this? How can you stop the yelling, sarcasm or hidden anger which entangles you in resentment and infects your relationships?
We teach the time-out skill as one of the best methods to stop anger from exploding or imploding.
“But, I don’t want to take a time-out when I feel angry”, you argue, “I want people to understand how they are wrong. I want to be understood. I want to get the problem solved.”
I hear these arguments from students and clients all the time. I can identify with these feelings when I’m experiencing conflict or disappointments.
The important aspect of this skill is that it stops anger from escalating. It stops the physiological fight/flight response we all have when someone or something triggers our anger.
When we take a time-out, we can implement some of the stress management or relaxation skills. During the time-out we can identify what is really happening and write out what we want or need. Maybe during the time-out we’ll discover that what we want is unrealistic or demanding. Or maybe we’ll find out that what we want is reasonable and necessary. Taking a time-out when we feel angry – can help us think through the issues and go back to the other person with one or two  requests or with an apology or with some options for working through our differences or misunderstandings.
So, why not take a break when you feel anger rising inside you?  A time-out will help you put a check on anger and check out whether it’s valid.
Listen to these podcasts: 4 Q’s to Disarming Anger
and Talk Yourself Out of Anger!
See all of the Quick Tips for Managing Anger podcasts at: www.whatsgoodaboutanger.com/podcasts.xml

Here are some resources to teach you skills for managing your anger: What’s Good About Anger? .
_________________

© copyright 2020 by Lynette J. Hoy, NCC, LCPC, CAMS-V. Lynette is a Marriage and Family Counselor with CounselCare Connection and National Certified Counselor. She is the co-author of What’s Good About Anger? and a speaker for community, women’s and church organizations.

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Defusing Anger & Rage- dealing with COVID-19

Question:

I hate what is going on in the world today! The COVID-19 pandemic has me so scared about going outside…But I also feel enraged that my family and I have to endure this! This has caused so much stress in my life and now I may lose my job. I find myself feeling on edge and irritable all the time. I worry about how people will treat me and whether they will disregard my feelings. Of course, now I feel a sense of loneliness too.
I just hope that I’ll be able to control my rage cause my patience is wearing dangerously thin. When I snap there will be requiem to pay. Any suggestions for how to deal with this? Struggling

Answer:

Dear Struggling Friend, I wonder if you would be willing to start changing yourself? You can’t change this situation we are in with the pandemic and you can’t change others or the way they treat you. What about working on building your confidence, finding coping skills to deal with stress and finding ways for controlling your anger? Actually, concentrating on yourself and finding ways to adapt to this highly stressful situation will help defuse your anger.
I have met people who have taken this time of quarantine to study and get certifications or to connect with others virtually.
The pandemic is out of our control but you can follow the guidelines, pray and move forward in your life and relationships even with the restrictions. Don’t let fear control your mind and actions.

Maybe anticipating the What If ? questions which run through your mind and how people will treat you is triggering anger and anxiety prior to any stressful event occurring.

Triggers: We discuss two types of cognitive triggers (podcast) in the book: What’s Good About Anger?.

One is when a stressful event occurs which actually triggers your thinking and anger because someone has disappointed or frustrated you by what they have done or not done. The other is when you anticipate someone will disappoint or frustrate you or something will go wrong – that thinking is the real trigger for your angry feelings.

Expect disappointment but, don’t let it overwhelm you. Life and people will disappoint us and let us down. That’s a fact. Maybe you have suffered from some abuse or discrimination. But, you are valuable. You have talents and a unique personality and gifts. You have a God-given purpose for living! Because of these and other reasons – the difficulties imposed on us during the pandemic and the way people treat you should not control how you feel about yourself, your life or your emotional response.

It’s normal to react with anger when someone disrespects or humiliates you. But, how they treat you should not cause you to overreact, feel shameful about yourself or insignificant. It’s when you lose value in yourself that you will react angrily.

Don’t let anyone control how you respond. Think this way instead:
1. “I can’t be certain that I will be treated negatively – I should just give them the benefit of the doubt”
2. “Maybe they are having a bad day”
3. “This isn’t worth losing my cool over”
4. “I may deserve to be treated better but, I’m not going to let this person trigger my anger”
5. “I’m going to take a time out to think over how to respond and then, come back to this person”.
6. “I’ve got better things to deal with now”
7. “Don’t pass a judgment on them – he/she doesn’t understand what he/she’s doing”
8. “I’m going to let this one pass. It’s not worth getting angry over.”
9. How can I adapt to this crisis? What can I do to keep myself calm and manage stress? What skills can I build on? How can I communicate my needs more clearly with respect? How can I grow spiritually during this time? What can I do to connect with and help others during this time?

Rise above this crisis and any trigger or scenario by changing your thinking, developing your emotional intelligence, increasing your self-esteem, growing in your faith and anger management skills.


© copyright 2020 by Lynette J. Hoy, NCC, LCPC, CAMS-V; President, Anger Management Institute blog, podcasts and resources

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Flying Off the Handle with Anger…

Question: Hi, I have a problem. About every six to eight months I seem to fly off the handle. Every time my wife gets an order of protection against me to stay away from her and our 9 year old daughter. I break things in the house, throw things around. I never hit her or the daughter. About 5 months ago I started going to the shrink for help and he told me I have bipolar. but I dont think so, I think its anger or intermittent explosive diorder. I’m alittle better than I was. I used to go off on a lot of things. I dont know what to do anymore, I have to get better for me and everyone involved. please help. thanks  

Answer: Dear Friend, I suggest you schedule anger management coaching/counseling and resources. See also http://www.whatsgoodaboutanger.com/ for resources and articles which will help you deal with the anger.

Issues and Triggers:

Most likely, you have issues beneath the surface which need to be explored but, you also need to become aware of triggers and stressors precipitating your anger, new coping skills to manage anger, and what thinking patterns may be contributing to your anger.

Log some of the situations which recently caused you to feel angry and fly off the handle. What were the triggers? What happened and what were you thinking? Did you catastrophize the situation? Did you jump to false conclusions or personalize the situation? Were you stressed out by something else?

Distorted thinking and false beliefs such as: “I deserve to be treated…” or “I am entitled to…” contribute to anger escalation. If you can begin to control the hot self-talk and challenge your thinking with reality and truth – your angry emotions will defuse. Taking a Time-out is one of the best ways to control your anger.

Our resources teach various coping skills for managing anger.

Mental Health treatment: Since your psychiatrist thinks you have bipolar disorder – I suggest you follow his recommendations for counseling and medication. Bipolar disorder does have a chemical/physiological basis and needs to be treated as such. Also, counseling can help give you perspective on your life, help you express your feelings and teach to healthy ways to cope with anger.

Since you have abusive tendencies – I suggest you read and order some of the resources found at: Safe Relationships. Listen to the following podcasts on managing anger:

Is it Anger or Abuse?
How do you know when someone is just angry or is being abusive? Here are some insights to help you recognize anger and how abuse and battering are so different.
Click to listen  to:
Talk Yourself Out of Anger!
It’s hard to believe that what you say to yourself can actually trigger and escalate your anger! Learn how to defuse anger through some simple self-talk messages!
Click to listen

© copyright 2020 by Lynette J. Hoy, NCC, LCPC, CAMS-V

Certified Anger Management Specialist-V, Diplomate, Consultant Traiber with the National Anger Management Association. President, Anger Management Institute and CounselCare Connection, P.C.
Anger Management Institute site, blog, podcasts and resources

 

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