Anger Management Trainer Certification … 6/17/07

What is Anger Management Trainer Certification? The What’s Good About Anger Institute Training Course offers certification in anger management for mental health counselors, social workers, pastors, educators, health professionals, probation and law enforcement officers through our distance-learning courses and training conferences. These programs provide participants with skills for teaching, coaching and counseling clients and students to manage their anger. The curriculum includes topics covering an overview of anger, assessment and progress tools, effective strategies for managing anger, 12-week guide for teaching groups or coaching individuals, marketing tips, facilitation skills and more!
Visit the What’s Good About Anger Institute shopping mall for a description of the  distance-learning trainer courses.
Register for the September 20-21, 2007 conference by downloading this PDF description of the Anger Management Trainer’s Conference .  Licensed professionals will receive up to 12 CEs and certification when you attend both days. This conference is approved for CEs by NBCC and IMHCA/IDPR. Call Lynette Hoy to register at: 708.524.3333, ext. 1.

Read the web site description here: http://www.whatsgoodaboutanger.com/trainers_conference_2day.asp!

Can I use this certification from What’s Good About Anger Institute to teach Anger Management classes?
…Yes, absolutely. Currently, there are no state laws that regulate anger management providers; therefore, trained and certified providers should offer programs, classes and courses.

What makes your organization reputable?
… The National Board of Certified Counselors and the Illinois Mental Health Counselors Association have both approved the What’s Good About Anger Institute Anger Management Trainer’s Conference for continuing education training (total 18 CEs in 2006 and 12 CEs in 2007) for LSWs, LCSWs, LPCs, LCPCs, LMFTs in Illinois and NCCs. Our program has been accepted and approved by the U.S. Probation Office in Tacoma, Washington and the McHenry County Probation office in Illinois. Our core trainers are experienced, professional marriage and family counselors and anger management specialists: Lynette J. Hoy, NCC, LCPC and Steve Yeschek, LCSW. Lynette is the co-author of both the What’s Good About Anger? first and second editions and the sole author of all the workbooks and trainer manuals. Lynette and Steve have trained hundreds of clients, students and professionals in anger management.

The Anger Management Trainers Conference Sept. 20-21, 2007 (2 Day) Brochure
This conference co-sponsored by the Illinois Mental Health Counselors Association (IMHCA) and CounselCare Connection, P.C. provides anger management trainer certification for participants, and fresh, research-based methods for previously certified trainers. This program has been approved by the National Board for Certified Counselors and IMHCA for CEs.
Conference curriculum is based on the expanded 2006 edition of What’s Good About Anger?, the B.A.R.K. manual and the revised “What’s Good About Anger Advanced Trainer’s manual. Counselors, leaders, correctional and probation officers, pastors, facilitators and educators are invited to attend and learn effective anger management skills and techniques for motivating and educating clients and students! Trainees will gain skills for: assessing potential students, teaching effective and practical anger management techniques, facilitating groups, managing difficult behavior and more!

Register for this conference by downloading the PDF of Anger Management Trainer’s Conference description.
Call Lynette Hoy to register at: 708.524.3333, ext. 1
.

Will the courts accept this model?
There is no single model of anger management that is the accepted “standard” for state courts in any state courts in the country. There are various researchers and noted authors in anger management, who all have very different views of the strategies needed to effectively manage anger. Our model is quickly becoming more recognized and accepted as a leading intervention for anger management, and to date, we have not had a single participant of any of our programs turned away for using the What’s Good About Anger – Anger Management model, classes and distance-learning courses. Our model uses some of the research-based material from Dr. Gary Gintner’s Behavioral Anger Reduction Kit along with widely-accepted interventions and skills for anger management. If the viability of your program or agency is every questioned, you can quickly remind the courts that the model you are using has been accepted and approved by courts throughout the USA; is being recognized for training of U.S. Probation officers and is approved for the training (providing CEs) of mental health professionals nationally by NBCC and in Illinois by IMHCA.…Interestingly, most anger management clients do not come from the courts. Most clients are either self-referred or referred by their employer.

There is no single model of anger management that is the accepted “standard” for state courts in any state courts in the country. There are various researchers and noted authors in anger management, who all have very different views of the strategies needed to effectively manage anger. Our model is quickly becoming more recognized and accepted as a leading intervention for anger management, and to date, we have not had a single participant of any of our programs turned away for using the What’s Good About Anger – Anger Management model, classes and distance-learning courses. Our model uses some of the research-based material from Dr. Gary Gintner’s Behavioral Anger Reduction Kit along with widely-accepted interventions and skills for anger management. If the viability of your program or agency is every questioned, you can quickly remind the courts that the model you are using has been accepted and approved by courts throughout the USA; is being recognized for training of U.S. Probation officers and is approved for the training (providing CEs) of mental health professionals nationally by NBCC and in Illinois by IMHCA.…Interestingly, most anger management clients do not come from the courts. Most clients are either self-referred or referred by their employer.There is no single model of anger management that is the accepted “standard” for state courts in any state courts in the country. There are various researchers and noted authors in anger management, who all have very different views of the strategies needed to effectively manage anger. Our model is quickly becoming more recognized and accepted as a leading intervention for anger management, and to date, we have not had a single participant of any of our programs turned away for using the What’s Good About Anger – Anger Management model, classes and distance-learning courses. Our model uses some of the research-based material from Dr. Gary Gintner’s Behavioral Anger Reduction Kit along with widely-accepted interventions and skills for anger management. If the viability of your program or agency is every questioned, you can quickly remind the courts that the model you are using has been accepted and approved by courts throughout the USA; is being recognized for training of U.S. Probation officers and is approved for the training (providing CEs) of mental health professionals nationally by NBCC and in Illinois by IMHCA.…Interestingly, most anger management clients do not come from the courts. Most clients are either self-referred or referred by their employer.

Is this the only certification training available to the public?
…There are many models and programs available now provided by reputable and experienced educators and professionals. Lynette Hoy is a Diplomate with the American Association of Anger Management Providers and a Professional member of the National Anger Management Association. The What’s Good About Anger Institute offers an extremely high quality model with research-based interventions. Those trained by WGAA have had their programs and classes approved and accepted throughout the USA.
See http://www.aaamp.org/ and http://www.namass.org/ for their directory of providers and trainer programs.

Why should I get certified as an Anger Management Trainer by the What’s Good About Anger Institute?
…This specialized training will assist you in working with clients, individuals and groups that specifically have issues relating to anger and stress management. Anger management is not psychotherapy; therefore, most clinicians are not properly trained to work with such clients. Our certification is ideal for educators, clinicians, parole, probation and correctional officers, clergy, substance abuse and domestic violence counselors, health professionals, human resource managers and anyone who wants or needs to help clients with anger related problems. Our model uses proven and effective techniques to teaching clients skills using our copyrighted curriculum. 99% of WGAA students and clients all have demonstrated improvement using our skills and techniques. Our training helps you to reframe anger and motivate others to change. We are now quickly growing and offer excellent anger management training. We will actively help you understand how to market your organization, list you in our directory and provide discounts on all client workbooks and support materials. We provide individual support for our trainers and students!

Where can I find out more information on your certification trainings?
…Please contact Lynette Hoy, NCC, LCPC at: counselor@hoyweb.com or 708.524.3333. Visit the What’s Good About Anger Institute shopping mall for a description of the  distance-learning trainer courses.

Register for the September 20-21, 2007 conference by downloading this PDF description of the Anger Management Trainer’s Conference

© copyright 2007 by Lynette J. Hoy, NCC, LCPC. Lynette is a Marriage and Family Counselor with CounselCare Connection and National Certified Counselor. She is the co-author of What’s Good About Anger?and a speaker for community, women’s and church organizations.

 

This entry was posted in Anger Management, Courses. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply